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ping Gary G.

From : gary glaenzer

Q: nope or else id have a list of transmissions that you dont unhook the radiator cooler on.......... hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high .

Replies:

From : roy

hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt you might want to ask your friend where the temp sensor he has is located. i run all winter at 140-150 unless im pushing snow. if i get to 200 for a sustained period i back off a bit. my sensor is in the line going to the cooler. what gary has said makes sense to me. if i were to require an additional cooler the factory one would be cut out of the loop. roy .

From : jerry

roy wrote you might want to ask your friend where the temp sensor he has is located. i run all winter at 140-150 unless im pushing snow. if i get to 200 for a sustained period i back off a bit. my sensor is in the line going to the cooler. what gary has said makes sense to me. if i were to require an additional cooler the factory one would be cut out of the loop. roy what would be the advantage in that since our transmissions dont run the fluid through the radiator wouldnt two cooler in-line be more advantageous just curious. jerry .

From : mac davis

on mon 15 sep 2003 183810 gmt gary glaenzer nobulltrans@mchsi.com wrote thanks gary... thats what i thought but he was so sincere.... nope or else id have a list of transmissions that you dont unhook the radiator cooler on.......... hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high .

From : john kunkel

hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high instead of asking an opinionated group member why not shoot some e-mail inquiries to the fluid refiners and see what they recommend for minimum fluid temperature. i think youll find their responses in line with your friends recommendation. remember the old admonition about never working a device hard until it warms up that isnt in agreement with the philosophy of you cant get a tranny too cool. not a big worry in most of california but dont forget the frozen north. john .

From : roy

roy wrote you might want to ask your friend where the temp sensor he has is located. i run all winter at 140-150 unless im pushing snow. if i get to 200 for a sustained period i back off a bit. my sensor is in the line going to the cooler. what gary has said makes sense to me. if i were to require an additional cooler the factory one would be cut out of the loop. roy what would be the advantage in that since our transmissions dont run the fluid through the radiator wouldnt two cooler in-line be more advantageous just curious. you are right. i was mixing the dak and the cummins. my bad. roy jerry .

From : roy

instead of asking an opinionated group member why not shoot some e-mail inquiries to the fluid refiners and see what they recommend for minimum fluid temperature. i think youll find their responses in line with your friends recommendation. remember the old admonition about never working a device hard until it warms up that isnt in agreement with the philosophy of you cant get a tranny too cool. not a big worry in most of california but dont forget the frozen north. john john i believe most of the fluid is there to help dissipate heat. i was getting to what i felt a little too warm and went to a double deep pan to increase the amount of fluid. the temp dropped about 15 degrees. id suggest some email inquires to the folks who build the transmissions and ask them what they feel is a safe operating range for their equipment. try dttat www.dieseltrans.com roy .

From : john kunkel

id suggest some email inquires to the folks who build the transmissions and ask them what they feel is a safe operating range for their equipment. try dttat www.dieseltrans.com btdt 160 is bills recommended ideal temperature. thats what the refiners will tell you too. stack coolers ten deep in an attempt to lower it below that and you serve no purpose. john .

From : tom lawrence

what would be the advantage in that since our transmissions dont run the fluid through the radiator wouldnt two cooler in-line be more advantageous just curious. what do you mean by our transmissions quoting directly from the 1995 fsm for rams all gas powered models equipped with an automatic transmission are equipped with a transmission oil cooler mounted internally within the radiator side tank. this internal cooler is supplied as standard equipment on all gas powered models equipped with an automatic transmission. all diesel models equipped with an automatic transmission are equipped with both a main water-to-oil cooler and a separate air-to-oil cooler. both coolers are supplied as standard equipment on diesel engine powered moels when equipped with an automatic transmission. now whether the cooler is mounted inside the radiator like the gas engines or externally like the diesel engines you still have transmission oil exchanging heat with engine coolant and therefore the potential at some point for cross-contamination. on either engine you can bypass the water-to-oil cooler while retaining the air-to-oil cooler. especially on the diesel engines with the water-to-oil cooler being mounted right underneath the turbo i wonder how much cooling it can really do sitting next to an 1100f chunk of cast iron like that. .

From : john kunkel

on tue 16 sep 2003 174149 gmt john kunkel kunkel.j@shorts.comcast.net wrote john.. if i wanted to ask an opinionated group member i would of asked you. if i wanted to post a message on a ng i would learn to use the keys at either end of the keyboard second row up. instead i asked gary... a professional and owner of a transmission shop.. the owner part of that is obvious but a professional knows the difference between opinion and fact. john .

From : kevin

tell you what. keep the inline factory cooler and add an additional. i have no idea the correct mileage of my 77 dodge but i do know that it has had the factory cooler and an aftermarked cooler air to fluid since new and the tranny still works great. being an old truck i want the fluid to not overheat but i know on a cold morning up here in the northwest 30 degrees my truck needs to warm up a bit before it will fully engage gears smoothly... hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high .

From : roy

little exaggeration on the external temperature of the engine/turbo isnt it tommy. ever stick your hand down there while the engine is running you really think the ambient temperature around that cooler is 1100 degrees. i think the engineers at chrysler and cummins pretty much knew what they were doing. havent heard of a transmission on the dodge cummins burning up yet from lack of cooling because of that chunk of cast iron as you call it. again .......... on our trucks i see no advantage in bypassing the factory cooler. jerry im not sure how hot the turbo or the air around it becomes. but the egt stays around 500-600 degrees unless im working it hard. thinking about it the bearing in the turbo does get real hot but i dont see that coming into play with the transmission temp. roy .

From : jerry

roy wrote im not sure how hot the turbo or the air around it becomes. but the egt stays around 500-600 degrees unless im working it hard. thinking about it the bearing in the turbo does get real hot but i dont see that coming into play with the transmission temp. roy i would imagine the turbo gets pretty damn hot but no where near 1100 degrees. i would assume your pyro is pre turbo and you are reading temp right from the cylinders. supposedly post turbo is about 300 degrees lower so with air flow around the cooler i dont think air temperature is a concern. think about how fast that exhaust gas cools by the time it gets to the end of the tail pipe. jerry .

From : jerry

tom lawrence wrote what do you mean by our transmissions we both drive the same type of trucks. but you already knew that didnt you. quoting directly from the 1995 fsm for rams all gas powered models equipped with an automatic transmission are equipped with a transmission oil cooler mounted internally within the radiator side tank. this internal cooler is supplied as standard equipment on all gas powered models equipped with an automatic transmission. who cares i was talking to roy about our trucks. all diesel models equipped with an automatic transmission are equipped with both a main water-to-oil cooler and a separate air-to-oil cooler. both coolers are supplied as standard equipment on diesel engine powered moels when equipped with an automatic transmission. so what does that have to do about the topic being fluid routed directly through the radiator now whether the cooler is mounted inside the radiator like the gas engines or externally like the diesel engines you still have transmission oil exchanging heat with engine coolant and therefore the potential at some point for cross-contamination. funny i didnt hear anyone talking about cross contamination. only heard talk about temperature radiators and the effects of operation of the transmission. on either engine you can bypass the water-to-oil cooler while retaining the air-to-oil cooler. ok if you want to. especially on the diesel engines with the water-to-oil cooler being mounted right underneath the turbo i wonder how much cooling it can really do sitting next to an 1100f chunk of cast iron like that. little exaggeration on the external temperature of the engine/turbo isnt it tommy. ever stick your hand down there while the engine is running you really think the ambient temperature around that cooler is 1100 degrees. i think the engineers at chrysler and cummins pretty much knew what they were doing. havent heard of a transmission on the dodge cummins burning up yet from lack of cooling because of that chunk of cast iron as you call it. again .......... on our trucks i see no advantage in bypassing the factory cooler. jerry .

From : mac davis

on tue 16 sep 2003 174149 gmt john kunkel kunkel.j@shorts.comcast.net wrote john.. if i wanted to ask an opinionated group member i would of asked you. instead i asked gary... a professional and owner of a transmission shop.. hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high instead of asking an opinionated group member why not shoot some e-mail inquiries to the fluid refiners and see what they recommend for minimum fluid temperature. i think youll find their responses in line with your friends recommendation. remember the old admonition about never working a device hard until it warms up that isnt in agreement with the philosophy of you cant get a tranny too cool. not a big worry in most of california but dont forget the frozen north. john .

From : mac davismac davis

on thu 18 sep 2003 015149 gmt fmb fmbb@sbcglobal.net wrote the web page looks very nice.... we have friends in redding so were looking forward to checking it out thanks! great place to go to relax but there are no hookups. they do have a place to drain your tanks though after you are done. check out http//www.burneyfalls.com/ fmb on wed 17 sep 2003 030901 gmt fmb fmbb@sbcglobal.net wrote they accepted but we didnt like their financing... shopping for a better deal now including the possibility of an equity line on the house... burny falls sounds really familiar... refresh my ol memory come on mac. whats the verdict did they accept your offer 10 days to burney falls... fmb on mon 15 sep 2003 224755 gmt roy roy@home.net wrote hey bro.. i was the one that recommended hotels to you remember lol yup ya got me. g anyway the one were lookin at now yeah were going to get her the one she wants has hot and cold water and a full shower... its gonna be like taking home with us but she likes it so what the hell... it has a fridge to keep beer cold and a microwave to make popcorn so it will work for me.. sounds like a neat package. how big is it or is the proper question how many does it sleep or sleep in it. roy well being a hybrid an rv trailer with pull out beds its kinda strange for its size... its 24 long in towing setup... then a queen size bed slides out the front and a double bed slides out of each side in the back... i guess youd figure 6 there... i think that there are a couple of fold down beds but not sure... if its more than us and another couple or us and the grandkids its too many dry weight is 3700 pounds so its definitely do-able in the dakota.. .

From : mac davis

on wed 17 sep 2003 180812 gmt john kunkel kunkel.j@shorts.comcast.net wrote on tue 16 sep 2003 174149 gmt john kunkel kunkel.j@shorts.comcast.net wrote john.. if i wanted to ask an opinionated group member i would of asked you. if i wanted to post a message on a ng i would learn to use the keys at either end of the keyboard second row up. instead i asked gary... a professional and owner of a transmission shop.. the owner part of that is obvious but a professional knows the difference between opinion and fact. john if i wanted to talk to you i wouldnt have pinged gary.... or to put it in words that you and your keyboard understand for the reading challenged that need caps to function if i wanted to hear an asshole i would have farted. .

From : mac davis

on fri 19 sep 2003 172847 gmt john kunkel kunkel.j@shorts.comcast.net wrote or to put it in words that you and your keyboard understand for the reading challenged that need caps to function ifcapsaretoomuchofabotherwhynotpostinthisformatitsavesalotoftimeandreducesba ndwidthconsiderablyjohn hmm... my guess is that because unlike the you and your butt buddies my iq is above room temperature .

From : redneck tookover helljohn kunkel

tihs si amzamnig! aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at cmabrigde uinervtisy it deosnt mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. the rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef but the wrod as a wlohe. fcuknig amzanig huh chaos confusion and trouble!!!! my work here is almost done .

From : john kunkel

or to put it in words that you and your keyboard understand for the reading challenged that need caps to function ifcapsaretoomuchofabotherwhynotpostinthisformatitsavesalotoftimeandreducesba ndwidthconsiderablyjohn .

From : budd cochran

i have the similar set up on my 79 d-150 318 with 727 and over 300000 miles on both. i ran one full colorado rocky mountain winter with just the auxiliary cooler and never had a problem. if your trans isnt shifting right when cold then you need it serviced. its not the fluids temperature thats causing the problem. budd kevin wrote tell you what. keep the inline factory cooler and add an additional. i have no idea the correct mileage of my 77 dodge but i do know that it has had the factory cooler and an aftermarked cooler air to fluid since new and the tranny still works great. being an old truck i want the fluid to not overheat but i know on a cold morning up here in the northwest 30 degrees my truck needs to warm up a bit before it will fully engage gears smoothly... hey gary... got into a discussion with a friend last night on transmission coolers for trucks with automatics and i wanted your opinion we were talking about add-on tranny coolers and i parroted your theory on disconnecting the radiator cooler because it could heat up your tranny fluid... he said that you should not remove the tranny cooler because it was needed to warm the tranny fluid so that it was in the operating temperature range needed to make the tranny perform and that the newer transmissions needed a temp of at least 160 to 180 to work..... he has a ford 3/4 ton diesel so i take all he says with a grain of salt ive always believed that you cant get a tranny too cool.. especially here in california where 30 degrees is cold.... do you know of any transmissions that actually require a min temp that high .